Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Information pertaining to Traditional Ecological Knowledge methods.

Mapping Traditional Knowledge: Digital Cartography in the Canadian North

Journal Title  - Cartographica: The International Journal for Geographic Information and Geovisualization
Volume 48, Issue 3, Page 189  - 199
Issue Cover Date  - 2013-01-01
   
DOI  - 10.3138/carto.48.3.1685

Social-Ecological Thresholds in a Changing Boreal Landscape: Insights from Cree Knowledge of the Lesser Slave Lake Region of Alberta, Canada

Brenda L. Parlee (University of Alberta), Karen Geertsema (University of Alberta) and Allen Willier (Lesser Slave Lake Indian Regional Council)

Ecology and Society 17(2): 20.

Training Manual on Field Research Methodology Designed for Cultural Mapping Field Officers

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World Intellectual Property Organization

Here is the Introduction:

Using Spatial Information Technology to FuseTraditional Native and Modern Resource Management Strategies

Bryan A. Marozas
GIS Coordinator
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Albuquerque Area Office
P.O. Box 26567
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125
(505) 346-7109
bryan_marozas@mail.doi.gov

Jhon Goes In Center
President
Innovative GIS Solutions, Inc.
Suite 300, 2000 S. College Ave.
Fort Collins, Colorado 80525
(970) 490-5900 Fax: 490-2300
jgic@innovativegis.com

Abstract: In the past, the tribal decision making process relied upon a valuable set of cultural and ecological knowledge to make resource management decisions. Today, tribes have begun to develop Integrated Resource Management Plans to help make informed resource management decisions. The premise of this paper is that these are two different resource management strategies. One is developed from tribal reference points throughout an aboriginal territory while the other is developed by land use planners within the extent of the reservation boundary. Due to the spatial nature of both management strategies, Geographic Information System (GIS) technology can be used to facilitate the inclusion of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the tribal decision making process.

Paper presented at the "Circles of Wisdom" Historical Reminders - Contemporary Issues - U.S. Global Change Research Program - Native Peoples - Native Homelands - Climate Change Workshop on October 31, 1998. Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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