Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Information pertaining to Traditional Ecological Knowledge methods.

Using Spatial Information Technology to FuseTraditional Native and Modern Resource Management Strategies

Bryan A. Marozas
GIS Coordinator
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Albuquerque Area Office
P.O. Box 26567
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125
(505) 346-7109
bryan_marozas@mail.doi.gov

Jhon Goes In Center
President
Innovative GIS Solutions, Inc.
Suite 300, 2000 S. College Ave.
Fort Collins, Colorado 80525
(970) 490-5900 Fax: 490-2300
jgic@innovativegis.com

Abstract: In the past, the tribal decision making process relied upon a valuable set of cultural and ecological knowledge to make resource management decisions. Today, tribes have begun to develop Integrated Resource Management Plans to help make informed resource management decisions. The premise of this paper is that these are two different resource management strategies. One is developed from tribal reference points throughout an aboriginal territory while the other is developed by land use planners within the extent of the reservation boundary. Due to the spatial nature of both management strategies, Geographic Information System (GIS) technology can be used to facilitate the inclusion of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the tribal decision making process.

Paper presented at the "Circles of Wisdom" Historical Reminders - Contemporary Issues - U.S. Global Change Research Program - Native Peoples - Native Homelands - Climate Change Workshop on October 31, 1998. Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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Enhancing Tribal Integrated Resource Management Plans by Integrating Traditional Knowledge with GIS Technology

Bryan A. Marozas
GIS Coordinator, Bureau of Indian Affairs

Abstract
In the past, the tribal decision making process relied upon a valuable set of cultural and ecological knowledge to make resource management decisions. More recently, some American Indian tribes have begun developing Integrated Resource Management Plans in an attempt to make informed resource management decisions. The premise of this paper is that it would be important to incorporate traditional cultural and ecological knowledge into the Integrated Resource Management Planning process. Due to the spatial nature of traditional cultural and ecological knowledge, Geographic Information System (GIS) technology can facilitate the inclusion of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the tribal decision making process.

For more information, please contact:

Bryan A. Marozas
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Albuquerque Area Office
Branch of Natural Resources
P.O. Box 26567
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125-6567
(505) 766-3334

Indigenous peoples and the use of intellectual property rights in Canada

Case studies relating to intellectual property rights
Submitted to:
Intellectual Property Policy Directorate
Corporate Governance Branch
Industry Canada
and to the:
Canadian Working Group on Art. 8(j) of the Biodiversity Convention
by:
HOWARD MANN, LL.M, Ph.D.
International and Environmental Law and Policy
Ottawa, Ontario
 
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Arctic Circle's TEK Links

The Arctic Circle provides links to several articles on the Internet about TEK:

http://arcticcircle.uconn.edu/HistoryCulture/TEK/index.html